Category Archives: Respect

Take the Americans to task, before they obliterate our trade

Hello

We cannot slump out of Brexit, just because it seems too hard.  It has always been the case that an exit on any subject involves a British law or one that needs to be made.  Presumably, MEP’s are pulling their weight and helping to disentangle us.

The reality of building inland lorry parks before they can begin to transit UK Customs means fewer exports.  This is why we must stay in the Customs Union.  I do not understand why this is a sticking point as the EU will have the same trouble exporting here.  The worst case scenario is that they dismiss the UK market, as import levies and traffic-choked roads is too expensive and time-consuming.

Ah, why not have a Premium Service, which will fast-track regular importers and exporters?  This is designed to keep hauliers in business from Dover.

So what is the UK as a business entity?

We trade with the EU and across the world.  They trade back with us.

Our Financial Analysts are the best in the world (according to ‘The Times’, 8 October 2017).  Companies are ignoring Goldman Sachs slipping away to Switzerland and digging in their heels here, in greater numbers. Great, thank you.

Start-up companies increase year-on-year.

Manufacturing reduces in public spats like the US Department of Commerce, which has temporarily slapped a 220% import tariff on C-series jets to be sold to Delta Airlines, in the US.

The US aircraft company, Boeing, complained to its government at what it saw as unfair subsidy by the British and Canadian governments.  Since all multi-billion projects have inward investment, the complaint looks unfair, to put it mildly.  And that is the problem; we are being too meek, unsure of which way Donald Trump will jump.

A word for the Irish company,Bombardier’s 4,000 highly-skilled workers who make the wings of the aircraft.  Their highly specialised jobs are at risk and for every worker, there are apparently four outsourcing jobs which rely on them.  Northern Ireland needs the UK government to object more strongly.

Sir Michael Fallon, Defence Secretary, said:

“Boeing is a major defence partner and one of the big winners of the latest defence review, so this is not the kind of behaviour we expect from a long-term partner.”

We cannot have Northern Ireland’s economy take a dive, as we are worried about upsetting our American partners.  Hello?  They don’t want to be partners anymore.  The special relationship does not exist in the brain of Donald Trump.  We have to object, or better still, take the Defence Review apart and see where else we can give out contracts instead of to the US.  This attempt by Boeing, which has doubtless had US government subsidies before, to extinguish a competitor, reveals an inward-looking attitude.  This is bad news for trade.

Boeing is one problem.  The import tariff exacerbates it.  The short- and long-term trade with the US, shows where their heart is: in the US.  Britain has been disrespected as a trading partner. They cannot be allowed to get away with it.  Otherwise Boeing is only the beginning.

LucyLou

 

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Which baddy is going to ruin our Christmas in 2017?

Hello there

Ironically, it is one of Labour’s biggest donors, the Communication Workers’ Union, which has called a strike on 25 and 26 November*, in protest at the planned closure of Royal Mail’s final salary pension scheme.

Last year, Royal Mail delivered 130 million parcels (according to The Daily Telegraph), but there may be darker forces at play here. The Labour Party uses a company called Whistl, for its own deliveries.  This could look like a calculated stab in the back for Royal Mail.  What if Royal Mail were to go out of business, as companies switch their deliveries to Whistl for a guaranteed arrival of presents?

Who is Amazon’s choice of delivery agency?  If it is Royal Mail, it would be useful for DWP staff to advise the potential strikers about the risks they are taking with their jobs.  Loss of business could overbalance Royal Mail, which has survived privatisation, due to some bold operating decisions.  Special Delivery and ‘signed for’ deliveries work very well and are profitable.

Larger companies, registered in the UK, have been closing final salary schemes, since 2000.  BHS, our beloved high street store, fell into administration last year, as its pension scheme was hugely underfunded. For some reason, The Pensions Regulator, part of the DWP (Department of Work & Pensions) decided to claim £350 million from Sir Robert Green, Chief Executive and that deal has concluded.  However it is not the full amount that was taken from the scheme. Just weeks later, BHS was sold to a serial bankrupt.  Are BHS employees being paid their pensions? What about future retirees?

Rifling pension funds was not supposed to happen after the tragedy of Robert Maxwell, who, in 1991, slipped off his yacht after weeks of slander in the media. He took £460 million out of his Mirror Newspaper Group’s pension scheme to repay other debts, especially in his American business.  His companies ended up having more debt than assets; a textbook business failure.  There were supposed to be laws to stop it ever happening again. However, then came BHS. And now Royal Mail.

Do you want Royal Mail to fail, because it cannot fund its pension scheme adequately to pay future retirements?  It has admitted to having to double its contributions from next year and cannot do it.  Therefore, it is commonsense to stop the final pension scheme now.  I am sure that someone behind the scenes has explained this to the CWU, but have they explained to the workers? They deserve explanation from the best : DWP staff, who are used to giving advice.

* These dates signal the start of ‘Black Friday’, the biggest online sales of the year.

LucyLou

 

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If There’s Any Sacking To Be Done – Insult To British Workers 04/10/17

Hello there

Boris Johnson’s Deputy is in the US.  With any luck, Sir Alan Duncan’s speech will largely have gone over the heads of the State Governors.

However, they know when someone takes a swipe at their voters.  The working-class, (now really a dead phrase to describe decent hardworking people), as Sir Alan Duncan ought to know, are quite often Conservative voters, as Conservatives are aspirational!

Perhaps the only tenet of Donald Trump’s government is to try and give the workers a better life. He is always positive and optimistic about Americans.  When the State Governors hear that Sir Alan thinks our people were ‘stirred up’ by the Brexit Campaign; well, we all were.  Shall we? Shan’t we?  We wanted plain information, but that was in short supply.

Mr Trump and the Senators will think that Sir Alan disrespects his own people, so how will he treat theirs?  What is he doing there, apart from causing a diplomatic incident?  He was at best patronising and at worst contemptuous of the workings of democracy (during the Brexit Referendum) and of the people. He described them as ‘throwing a tantrum’, which I think is tantamount to insulting our whole country.

So, Mrs May, or is it Boris who should respond?  What more damage can your Deputy inflict?  Bring him back home quickly and give him a job that shows him how to respect workers.  After all, they make our economy strong and bring us peace and prosperity.

LucyLou

PS I hope that no-one uses this to hurt Boris, as he gave a rousing speech to the Conservative Conference and kept delegates in a ripple of laughter, mostly at his wonderful use of the English language.  Mrs May is very clever to keep him as a support to the Conservative delegates.  Apparently they have been nodding a little at previous speeches.

LucyLou

 

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Mrs May – Help With Coughing

Hello there

Theresa May has proved to be a strong leader,  as she let her Ministers share the burden of talking to the  public and the Conservative Conference.  I don’t remember Maggie Thatcher, the only other female Prime Minster, ever letting her male Cabinet perform.

However everyone needs help sometime and Mrs May’s coughing could be a hiccup or tripping over an emotional blockage in her throat.  I think that most public speakers experience this at some point in their careers.

Think me crazy, yet she could look at Chakras, which are energy centres in the body.  You improve your throat, or fifth chakra by doing some quick exercises.  It clears any old patterns and emotional blockages.  More importantly, it does work.   Carol Tuttle is a Master Practitioner, found here:

https://my.liveyourtruth.com/dyt/chakra-healing-type-4-energy/

(This website popped up in my browser.  It is just a coincidence and is not intended to say that Mrs May is any particular type.)

I do wonder, however, why no-one in the hall thought to get her a drink.  Why was that so difficult?

I hope this helps everybody who has had a cough while speaking.

LucyLou

PS Let me add a late remark.  Theresa May naturally had access to a glass of water, yet once you have a cough, with laryngitis, it is difficult to stop.  A longtime friend dashed forward with a throat lozenge; what lovely gestures she has from old friends.

 

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A Worldwide Failure in Computer Check-Ins – 28/09/2017

Hello Everyone

Does no-one see this as a warning?  Last time this happened, a young man was sent to jail, extradited from Britain to the US, because he infiltrated their computer systems.  But he saved the world and hackers everywhere are rightly angry.  We need them on our side.  How about putting them to work on the space race?

Someone is practising disruption or testing a system.  Maybe they think that ‘network problems’, cited  everywhere by software company, Amadeus, will mean less concentration on security, so as to get harassed passengers off the ground.

It shows me that there should be at least one desk at check-in where passengers are processed manually, not a computer in sight.  It is then the customer’s decision whether or not to use a manual check-in desk. It depends on what section of the market appeals most to a particular airline. If a section of airline passengers worry excessively over travelling, that should determine the airline’s response.

The response to a threat is always to keep customers safe and broadly give them, with respect, the experience they want.  War is irrelevant in this context.

LucyLou

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Hello Everyone

If M. Jean- Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission has to stoop low as to suggest weakness of character on the part of David Davis, the chief Brexit negotiator, the insult may ping right back at him.  It also means that he can find no fault in Mr Davis’ job performance.  It is actually a back-handed compliment.

I suspect that the British are rightly being intransigent to procure the best deal.  The French would not understand intransigence as they see it every day when looking in the mirror.  Are Luxembourgers of the same mould?

It is just that David Davis has to keep going and leave soundbites to other people.  Retaliation is what they want.  In these situations, the British smile serenely and ignore the comments.  The opposition cannot figure out whether they are being insulted or not.

As of today, M. Juncker is seeking to combine two roles: his current position, with presidency of the EU.  For me, democracy needs transparent argument.  If there is no opposition to conflict with, it becomes a different society altogether. I thought it may be harsh comment.  However I have just asked Google and  this came up:

The European is ‘charged with defining the European Union’s (EU) overall political direction and priorities.’

Absolutely not; it will be 27 countries with 1 Head of State.  Brexit cannot come soon enough now, although I was like a reed in the wind at Referendum time.

Have a smiling week

LucyLou

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Hello Everyone

Somebody was complaining in ‘The Daily Telegraph’ 1st September, about £100m being spent on Civil Servants who undertake overseas postings and take their families with them.  Well, that is a small sum compared to what it was, as its aim has been largely fulfilled in the public sector.  In the early 1900’s, Britain sent out its brightest Civil Servants to the outposts of the Empire and they would train up the locals to do his job and then they would be posted somewhere else.

Is the Telegraph saying that the families do not deserve somewhere to live, roughly appropriate to their English accommodation?  That their children do not deserve to be educated?  With education, doing well is a question of consistency in the way a child is taught and familiarity with that style will continue when they reach England again. The child is given a private education to provide stability through three-yearly contracts.  To my knowledge that was primarily in the military or teachers or the airlines.

Fifty years ago and more, the private sector in Britain wanted its Executives to have overseas experience.  My husband and I went to Portugal for three years. This meant that suddenly grandparents did not see the beloved grandchild for months and going out there was their only other option.  Uprooting from families and friends is something that you have to do, so companies will compensate with material things like paid flights home three times a year.  My expatriate life revolved around children and making new friends.

New people came out all the time as everyone revolved around the world, yet the friendships have lasted almost 30 years.  You need it to accustom yourself to a new life and I loved it all.

So £100m is good value for money.  It is much better to have children with you than sending them off to boarding school at seven years’ old.  Some of those girls suppressed their emotions so much in order to blend in that they found it difficult to have children.  Thanks Dad for coming home when I reached five. I would have been an entirely different person if I had had to go to boarding school.

LucyLou

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